Monday, January 8, 2018

Case of the Week 476

This week's case is a worm that was found near the anogenital region of a young child while she was being bathed by her mother. The child is asymptomatic.
 Anterior end:
Posterior end: 

Identification? What is the potential significance of this finding?

19 comments:

Eagleville said...

Trichuris. Screen for anemia.

Adolfo said...

Toxocara canis,the human is not the definitive host

Idzi P. said...

I agree with Adolfo. The cobra-like appearance, the lips (3?),... looks like Toxocara sp. (canis/cati). Humans are not appropriate hosts.
Probably expelled by pet of the family.
If infected eggs (from soil) are ingested, humans can be accidental hosts (larva migrans).

Atiya Kausar said...

I agree Adolfo and Idzi it's Toxocara canis humans are accidental host ...ask for a history of puppies as pets at home deworming therapy to be given .. as for child need to look for any symptoms....beautiful anterior end head and posterior end pics

Anonymous said...

I agree with Adolfo, Idzi and Atiya, although I would say Toxocara cati (photo 3: arrow-shaped cervical alae). Interesting case. Apart from what was already pointed out by my predecessors, could it also be a spurious parasitism, through the ingestion of larval forms or immature adults of the worm by the child?
In any case, it would be necessary to investigate more as always that these types of samples are received.
Very good pictures by the way, Dr. Pritt
Luis

Anonymous said...

Toxocara spp-

Carlo Alberto Varlani

Anonymous said...

I remembered a really nasty story of a child who ate adults of Toxocara cati that she extracted directly from the anus of her pet (calling them "kitty's spaghetti") and she ate them whole.

Maybe this child did the same and passed the worm undigested? Anyway this kid should be tested for a Toxocara infection.

-HLCM fan.

Sylvie said...

I would say Toxocara cati because of the alae that are larger than those of Toxocara canis.

Idzi P. said...

Wooow HLCM fan!
That IS a very nasty story!!!
Stuff to tell to your friends during dinner!
:-D

Idzi P. said...

Wooow HLCM fan!
That IS a very nasty story!!!
Stuff to tell to your friends during dinner!
:-D

Anonymous said...

An excellent photographic presentation of Toxocarariasis. The other good thing was that the patient showed no sign of occular nor visceral larval migrans. The lateral cephalic alae and terminal micron are clearly rendered.
Florida Fan

Anonymous said...

Why not human ascaris?

Joe Camp said...

The alae are typical of Toxocara cati.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for information

Anonymous said...

toxocara cati adult worm

William Sears said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
William Sears said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
William Sears said...

Toxocara. Not sure of species. But, it does mean that the sweet family pet and baby have been using the same tub.

Octávio Carraça said...

I believe HLCM fan may be near the truth, because Toxocara mystax (Sin. Toxocara cati) does not reach adult stage in Human beings when these ingest the embryonated eggs that contaminate soil, where sometimes children play, and end up ingesting thru accident or "pica" behavior. In this case, i.e. after ingestion of L2 larvae in eggs, the life cycle is migratory, and Humans generaly have Larva Migrans problems, when the migratory larvae get"lost" in a non-feline paratenic host.

Nevertheless, L2 larvae may also be found in the tissues of earthworms and cockroaches, besides rodents or birds as the most common intermediate hosts. And also, when kittens ingest milk from an infected mother, they ingest the L3 larva, that will display a non-migratory life cycle.

Therefore, and adding to the great "kitty spaghetti" hypohesis, I would like to add the "earthworm spaghetti", the "roach candy" and the "Mamma Kitty milk" ingestion theories to this case, even though it is very, very unusual (and contradicted by bibliography) that the ingested larval stages would reach adult stage in a Human host.

Very, very intersting case. Thank you for your work as curator of this wonderful Horribilis Natural Museum.