Monday, March 12, 2018

Case of the Week 485

This week's case is donated by Dr. Luis Fernando Solórzano Álava from Ecuador. The 'patient' is not a human, but rather an Ecuadorian snail. However, the parasite shown is indeed very pathogenic to humans and has a predilection for the central nervous system.
You can also see the video HERE.

Any thoughts on its identification?

9 comments:

Guillermo Martínez Molina said...

Angiostrongylus cantonensis

M.C. Martín R. Hernández C. said...

Angiostrongylus cantonensis larvae 3

Anonymous said...

Angiostrongylus cantonensis

C.A.Varlani

Idzi P. said...

I agree! Angiostrongylus sp.
Based upon the predilection for the CNS and on the typical morphology of the tail, I agree with species identification A. cantonensis.

Sugar Magnolia said...

Angiostrongylus cantonensis; i.e., rat lungworm. Snails are the intermediate host for this nematode, while rats are definitive hosts. Humans can be incidental hosts after ingesting the larvae from the snails themselves, or contaminated produce or water. Eosinophilic meningitis is a serious and sometimes fatal complication of Angiostrongylus infection.

Anonymous said...

Yes, every clue points to a diagnosis of Angiostrongylus cantonensis the agent of eosinophilic meningitis. Let's not forget the other Angiostrongylus a.k.a costaricensis, though this later one is clinically more related to the intestinal tract, causing eosinophilic enteritis and is endemic in Central and South America.
Florida Fan

Agnes K said...

Angiostrongylus cantonensis, predilection site of larva in the brain; intermediate host is slug / snail

William Sears said...

A cantonensis L3 larvae. Note the terminal projection at posterior end.

Also, another very helpful clue is when the expert in the video describes the worm in spanish as A cantonensis. It would be nice if all larvae came with their own narrator.

Hans Hoffmann said...

What a wonderful Video!