Monday, October 15, 2018

Case of the Week 515

This week's case is a "worm" found in the cecum - an incidental finding during colonoscopy. It measures approximately 4 cm long. Identification? Images by my Parasitology technologist extraordinaire, Heather Rose Arguello.




15 comments:

Anonymous said...

Beautiful pictures. We can clearly see the thread like anterior portion and an inflated posterior, giving the worm resemblance to a whip. The excretory cells of the anterior are clearly defined. The posterior contains a few oblong ova. All clues are consistent with a female Trichuris Trichuris. Of course, this kind of infection is usually diagnosed as purely incidental.
Florida Fan

Idzi P. said...

Trichuris trichiura. The whipworm! Typical shape gives the name... It is a female as I can see trichuroid eggs in utero. Parasitology is so beautiful! Allow me to wink away a few tears...

Joe Camp said...

A very nice image of Trichuris trichiura!

Luis Fernando Solorzano said...

Nice Trichuris trichiura

Anonymous said...

Sorry, I remember the name now. Those are called stichosomes.
Florida Fan

Hunlang said...

Trichuris trichiura worm

William Sears said...

trichuris trichuria

Atiya Kausar said...

Whip worm or trichuris trichuris ....size of worm and eggs suggest it's a female gravid worm...beau beaut pucs

AAM-86 said...

Nice picture of parasite Tricharis tricharis "go a head"

Stefaan Kurvers said...

Whipworm, Trichuris trichiura. Nice picture!

Old One said...

Brava Heather Rose, beautiful photos. Wonderful images of the stichocytes (bread loaf cells). I've often wondered about them. I understand they are secretory but to what purpose. And what about the reduced diameter of the anterior end of the worm? Are they adaptations for host tissue penetration and or blood leting? Does anyone know?

Just a couple observations about the bipolar eggs.

My experience is with veterinary parasitology. Within that limited world I've noticed that the protein coats of Trichuris sp. egg shells are smooth as compared to the textured coat (rough, pitted, or fenestrated) of capillarids. Also capillarid eggs usually are asymmetrical as apposed to the symmetrical () eggs of Trichuris.

Size, morphology, presence of stichocsome and bipolar eggs lead to the diagnosis of Trichuris trichiura
adult female.

Anonymous said...

Great remark Old One on the differentiation between T.trichuria and Capillaria. Another Trichuris egg which may be mistaken with is T.vulpis, though this later one has larger eggs 72-90 nm.
Florida Fan

Blaine A. Mathison said...

When your booty's been turned inside-out
and you go to your doc to get it checked out
You'll feel yourself start to squirm
as he describes the culprit, whipworm
cuz Trichuris trichura like to let it to all hang out

Old One said...

Wonderful.

ali mokbel said...

Chapeau bas to Heather Rose Arguello for her excellent photographic skills of shooting an adult female Trichuris trichura worm. I'd also like to share Idzi's passion for parasitology by saying that a Trichurid egg is the most beautiful parasitic stage that I've ever seen.