Monday, February 10, 2020

Case of the Week 580

This week's case was donated by Dr. Neil Anderson. The following objects were seen in an EDTA blood specimen obtained from a patient with recent travel to sub-Saharan Africa (note that the blood was ~10 days old when the video was taken).




Identification?
What additional analysis might be indicated?

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Look into my EYE (hi..hi..) and one DAY (hi..hi..), I might tell you this looks very much like Loa loa as it has 4 elongated nuclei, extending to the tip of its tail! 10 days?!? Woaaaw!!!

Idzi P. said...

Oooops - that was me, Idzi P.
;-)

Anonymous said...

That is Loaloa microfilariae as the body nuclei fill up to the end of the tail

Anonymous said...

First, this is a microfilaria infection. The sheath is very faint or barely discernible, this together with the geographic location help us rule out Brugia and Mansonella species. The blood source rules out a Dracunculus infection. The larva has a very short empty cephalic space and its nuclei extends to the end of the tail excluding Wucheria bancrofti. All details narrows the choice of identification to Loa Loa as stated by Idzi.
Florida Fan

Cristina said...

Looks like loa loa

Paul Divis said...

Onchocerca volvulus?

William Sears said...

I'm pretty sure I see the nuclei going lower and lower.....

Loa Loa

NIH arms are wide open for testing and treatment if so needed.

Better check for onchocerca and get a filarial count

nema said...

for this bloody line I think rather of a non pathogene species like dipetalonema perstans or mansonella perstans.

Polymerase Chain Reaction would more surely identify the parasite in question

bks said...

Very naive question @nema: How does PCR work in this case? Can you amplify DNA from the entire sample, or do you need to "rescue" the critter first?

Unknown said...

Filarial worm. Wuchereria bancrofti or Loa loa.