Monday, November 18, 2019

Case of the Week 569

This week's case was captured by my awesome Parasitology Education Specialist, Felicity Norrie, MLS(ASCP). The following were identified from skin scrapings from a resident of a skilled nursing facility. Identification?


12 comments:

Eagleville said...

Sarcoptes scabei

Dwight Ferris said...

Scabies - Sarcoptes scabiei

Idzi P. said...

Sarcoptes scabiei.
Mite, eggs and scyballa.
Very very very cool video material!

Idzi P. said...

In the first picture one can even see some mite-structures (paws?) in the upper eggs!
Nice!

Anonymous said...

I totally agree with my colleagues before me. This is our old and unpleasant friend Sarcoptes scabiei.
By the way, very good photos and spectacular video.
Luis.

Marc Couturier said...

This is Sarcoptes and it should be killed with fire! Fill dish with ethanol...light the lamp.

!DISCLAIMER!: I do not actually endorse such careless behaviour in the laboratory, but I still maintain it should be killed with fire :)

nema said...

Sarcoptes scabei, very cool ok but very contagious as well. So, all the resident of this skilled nursing facility must be investigated and/or the close contacts be treated at the same time, as well as (may be) health workers.

Anonymous said...

What a nice case of itch mite infestation. All phases of development are present including the excrement scyballa. The mother mite is impressingly active.
Nicely captured photography.
Congratulations from Saigon,
Florida Fan

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Anonymous said...

Great Pictures.
See scabies a lot in our diagnostic lab. Scabies is not a problem of lack of hygiene but of overcrowding and wherever close person-to person contact is common. Scabies spreads quickly especially in nursing/care homes if no skilled GP or dermatologist is available to diagnose the index Patient, even in highly developed countries.

Jose Q said...

This is a sarcoptes scabiei. I had the opportunity to see it alive in a wet mount. They look scary.

Unknown said...

Sarcoptes scabiei